Partitioning in Windows 7

Needed to remove junk from a USB thumb drive. Google search yielded a nice find at http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/219693/unable-to-format-usb-stick-to-full-capacity/

1) Type “DISKPART” from the Command Prompt (accessible by clicking on Start and then typing “cmd” into the open field); you will then see the following prompt: DISKPART>

2) Type “LIST DISK” to see what number your USB drive is listed as.

3) Type “SELECT DISK 2” (if your USB is disk 2; replace # with your disk #); Diskpart will confirm that “Disk 2 is now the select disk.”

4) Type “SELECT PARTITION 1” (this command selects what should be the only partition on your USB drive, the small one that you want to delete to get back the larger, full partition size). Diskpart will confirm with “Partition 1 is now the selected partition.”

5) Type “DELETE PARTITION”. This will delete the old partition. There are no warning prompts if you have existing data – make sure you have copied everything off before doing this!

6) Type “CREATE PARTITION PRIMARY” to create a new, full-size partition. Diskpart will confirm with message of “Diskpart succeeded in creating the specified partition.” You can type in “LIST PARTITION” to confirm the new, full-size.

7) Type “EXIT” to leave Diskpart. You can now format your USB drive by using the standard Windows formatting process.

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Barracuda Green ST2000DL003

http://www.seagate.com/files/staticfiles/support/docs/manual/desktop/Barracuda%20Green/100649225c.pdf

Reformatted a bit to fit on page.

I have 6 of these (2TB) in each NAS Raid5 setup plus motherboard, AMD cpus, RAM etc.
This page is for researching a replacement PSU.

2.8.1 Power consumption
Power requirements for the drives are listed in Table 2 on page 15. Typical power measurements are based on an average of drives tested, under nominal conditions, using 5.0V and 12.0V input voltage at 25°C ambient temperature.

• Spinup power Spinup power is measured from the time of power-on to the time that the drive spindle reaches operating speed.

• Read/write power and current
Read/write power is measured with the heads on track, based on a 16-sector write followed by a 32-ms delay, then a 16-sector read followed by a 32-ms delay.

• Operating power and current
Operating power is measured using 40 percent random seeks, 40 percent read/write mode (1 write for each 10
reads) and 20 percent drive idle mode.

• Idle mode power
Idle mode power is measured with the drive up to speed, with servo electronics active and with the heads in a random track location.

• Standby mode
During Standby mode, the drive accepts commands, but the drive is not spinning, and the servo and read/write electronics are in power-down mode.

Table 2 DC power requirements
Avg (watts 25°C) Avg 5V typ amps Avg 12V typ amps
Spinup — — 2.1
Idle* † 4.5 0.151 0.303
Operating 5.8 0.440 0.300
Standby 0.50 0.085 0.01
Sleep 0.50 0.085 0.01

Avg (watts 25°C) Avg 5V typ amps Avg 12V typ amps
Spinup 2.1
Idle* † 4.5 0.151 0.303
Operating 5.8 0.440 0.300
Standby 0.50 0.085 0.01
Sleep 0.50 0.085 0.01

*During periods of drive idle, some offline activity may occur according to the S.M.A.R.T. specification, which may increase acoustic and power to operational levels.
†5W IDLE, Standby and Sleep,with DIPLM Enabled

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Seagate ST32000542AS 2TB Setup

A lot of ST32000542AS drives come with the CC34 firmware. Apparently it has various known problems, one of which is an annoying click (click of death). The first thing you’ll want to do is upgrade the firmware to CC35. A Link to the instructions is in the references section below.

Once that is done, the next step, if it exists, is removing HPA from the drive.
You’ll know it has HPA enabled by running hparm. HPA results in less capacity and so it’s not a good thing in an array.

We’ll be using Debian 6.0 (squeeze).

hparm -N /dev/sdb

You should see a difference in the numbers here. I chose to take the highest number. This completely disables HPA.

hdparm -N p3907029168 /dev/sdb

Finally, we should end up with full usability of the drive.

fdisk -l /dev/sdb

Disk /dev/sdb: 2000.4 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/sdb doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Power cycle (not reboot) to confirm settings survive.

References:
Updating the firmware on the drives:
Seagate 2TB ST32000542AS CC35 Firmware upgrade

Disabling HPA using hdparm:
unRAID Server Community parity

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Debian Squeeze iscsitarget

Since Debian squeeze doesn’t appear to include pre-built iscsitarget kernel modules, the iscsitartget-dkms must be installed. This is a source package and will install gcc etc to compile. It should compile automatically.

apt-get install iscsitarget-dkms

Here is a list of iscsi related packages I installed on my secondary NAS:
iscsitarget 1.4.20.2-1 iSCSI Enterprise Target userland tools
iscsitarget-dkms 1.4.20.2-1 iSCSI Enterprise Target kernel module source – dkms version
open-iscsi 2.0.871.3-2squeeze1 High performance, transport independent iSCSI implementation

I found this info in a bug report through google after I received a module not found error when issuing a /etc/init.d/iscsitarget restart

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